Nov 282012
 

The term “bosun”, a sailorly contraction of the Old English “boatswain”, implies widely different roles from one vessel to another. On some ships the bosun is an officer; on others a rig specialist. Even the translation is debated: some sources say a “swain” was an attendant, while others give a more romantic definition of “lover”. (I like to say I’m the ship’s husband…) Regardless, on Clearwater, the bosun cares for the traditional aspects of the rig, which includes regular inspections for safety concerns.

I thought some people out there might be interested in what my monthly rig checks involve. When I was mate on the Bill of Rights and had never before done a rig check, it felt like a vast and unconquerable task. There is so much to a boat! Brion Toss gives an elegantly succinct description in “The Rigger’s Apprentice” of what a rig-check on a boat involves, boiled down to four main points:

1. If it fastens two things together, it will try its damndest to wiggle itself loose.

2. If it touches something else, it will chafe the hell out of either itself or the thing it touches.

3. If it’s metal, it will either crumble in the face of whatever other metal is around it, or else it will mercilessly corrode everything it touches.

4. If it’s loose, it will inevitably catch, snag and tear.

With this as a guide, I examine the rig from stem to stern, topmast to hull. Before leaving Clearwater for the season, I was able to snap some shots of some of the things I look for in rig checks. Aside from these things, I am always and especially looking for loose nuts, rusty or non-existent mousings (wire lashings to secure pins in shackles), pins backing out of shackles, loose lashings in the bow net or shrouds, and squeaky blocks. All of these could result in injury if not attended to before they become a problem.

A type of line degradation called "long jawing", in which, due to deformation, only one or two strands of the line take the full load.

A type of line degradation called “long jawing”, in which, due to deformation, only one or two strands of the line take the full load.

A "whipping" sews up the end of a line to neatly keep it from unraveling. When you make a sailor's whipping, which involves a palm and needle, you never imagine it could someday become worn to uselessness.

A “whipping” sews up the end of a line to neatly keep it from unraveling. When you make a sailor’s whipping, which involves a palm and needle, you never imagine it could someday become worn to uselessness!

Early signs of wear in a long splice.

Early signs of wear in a long splice.

Small holes in the head of the mainsail can easily turn into big holes if not attended to.

Small holes in the head of the mainsail can easily turn into big holes if not attended to.

 

Nov 192012
 

Recently in preparation for the winter, and as part of a regular maintenance schedule, we pulled Clearwater’s centerboard. For those of you who aren’t tall-ship experienced, I’ll try my best to explain what a centerboard is, how it works, and how we pulled it. I’ll let the photos explain the rest.

The centerboard is a 15 or so foot long retractable keel whose forward end pivots on a point inside the hull about a third of the way from the bow. The pivot point is inside the centerboard “trunk”, which is basically a big, framed out hollow in the middle of the boat, a bit like a wheel well. It is raised and lowered by a winch on a cable attached to the after end, at about the middle of the boat.

To pull the centerboard, lines are attached to the tops of the forward and after ends, and then run through blocks on deck. The board is hoisted a little to take the weight off the pin, and then on either side of the centerboard trunk, large metal caps are unscrewed to reveal the pivot point, out of which a large pin must be driven. As you may have guessed, removing these caps allows large amounts of water to pour into the boat, so time is of the essence. Plexiglass and a flashlight are used on either side to line up the openings in the trunk with the one in the centerboard. When you are thoroughly soaked and grateful that you vacuumed out the bilges so the bilge pumps wouldn’t get clogged, you drive out the pin and pop those caps back on. Then you take a breath.

The rest is gravy…lower the board, then run a “lazy line” under the hull to catch the lines the centerboard is hanging on, pull them to the other side, and haul up the board!

Lines are attached to both ends of the centerboard.

Lines are attached to both ends of the centerboard, forward…

The anchor bend.

…and aft. We chose to use the anchor bend.

Hoisting the centerboard to prepare for pulling the pin.

Hoisting the centerboard to prepare for pulling the pin.

Positioning the pipe wrench.

Positioning the pipe wrench.

When WD40, a four foot lever, and three grown sailors don't do trick, try heat.

When WD40, a four foot lever, and three grown sailors don’t do trick, try heat.

Next time, never seize.

Next time, never seize.

The cap is off! Using plexi-glass and a flashlight to align the hole in the centerboard with the hole in the trunk.

The cap is off! Using plexi-glass and a flashlight to align the hole in the centerboard with the hole in the trunk.

Flashlight.

Flashlight.

Driving out the pin.

Driving out the pin.

Waiting for the centerboard.

Waiting for the centerboard.

First sighting...

First sighting…

The centerboard is up!

The centerboard is up!

Clearwater with centerboard alongside.

Oct 302012
 

A lot of you probably know already that the HMS Bounty sank off the coast of North Carolina early Monday morning. The entire tall-ship community and beyond is in mourning.  I send my prayers and condolences to the family, friends and ship-mates of Claudene Christian, who was recently found unresponsive and later pronounced dead, and Captain Robin Walbridge, who has still not been found.  Deepest gratitude to the brave Coasties who went out into that storm to rescue the crew.

Oct 102012
 

I’m trying to get myself back into regular posting amidst a busy fall season and limited internet access, so I thought posting some random photos from the last couple of months on Clearwater would be a nice start…

Coffee and work.

Coffee and work.

The government won't set you free. Chores will set you free.

The government won’t set you free. Chores will set you free.

Unfouling the pennant at anchor.

Unfouling the pennant at anchor.

 

Jul 012012
 

It is nearly six months since I arrived in Tasmania. The intense and challenging voyaging season is over. The sea-sickness is but a memory, with people suddenly coming out of the woodwork assuring me that Winde in particular sends her passengers to the rail more than other ships. I am rested, encouraged, just home-sick enough, and I have a job!

ClearwaterIf you’ve been keeping up, you might remember a few posts ago, I wrote about my top choices for employment this fall. The Isaac Evans, Sultana and Clearwater were tied for first place, and I was recently hired as Bosun on the Sloop Clearwater for the fall season!

I’m really excited to be sailing on Clearwater, for many reasons. The first is its environmental mission. The Clearwater Organization was started in the mid-sixties by American folk-singer Pete Seeger in order to build environmental awareness about the Hudson River, which at the time was very polluted. The sloop was launched in ’69 as a symbol of environmental stewardship and teaching tool for young students. Clearwater continues its environmental mission today, with multi-faceted programming, not limited to the work done on the sloop. I was raised as an environmentalist, and I look forward to using my science degree to teach about something that is so important to me.

The second is the music. As I said, Pete Seeger started the organization, and continues to be involved today. For the last six months I’ve barely picked up a guitar, and it’s the longest period I’ve spent without almost daily music practice. I’m really looking forward to joining a ship whose history is intertwined with music.

The third is the Hudson River! So far I’ve sailed around the islands of Maine, some harbors in Massachusetts, the Eastern Pacific of Southern California, and now the Southern Ocean, but I have no inland experience! I’m looking forward to learning about inland rules of navigation, and putting everything I’ve learned in my Coxswain’s course to work.

Finally, I’m excited about the rig. After a square-rigger and a bunch of schooners, three sails is sure to feel sparse, but every ship has her own secrets to share, and I’ll be glad to get to know a new rig. Sometimes the simplest things in life are the most enjoyable.