Dec 192012
 
This is an old photo of me on my very first schooner! These cabin tops were finished with Deks Olje, a two-part finishing product that doesn't fall into any of the categories mentioned here.

This is an old photo of me on my very first schooner! These cabin-tops were finished with Deks Olje, a two-part oil product that doesn’t fall into any of the categories mentioned here.

Recently I finished editing Clearwater’s maintenance manual. The original is an amazing document that was created in the late 70′s, and has provided invaluable information to bosuns over the years. I highly recommend maintenance manuals and logs to everyone out there maintaining any kind of boat. Even if it’s just you and your own little dinghy, you’d be amazed at the little things you forget, and how helpful a full and detailed record can be for proper, long-term maintenance.

What follows is an excerpt from one of my additions to the manual. I have cared for brightwork here and there over the years, but by no means am I an expert. As I’ve gone from ship to ship, I’ve often been curious and confused about the very specific wood-finishing choices that are vehemently touted by each one. Everyone has their favorite, and their reasons why.

With a manual containing 30 years worth of mixtures and instructions, I was frustrated by the lack of explanations for LTV here, varnish there, and simply Penetrol in other places. I did a little research, and found that there are few places that give fact-based, comprehensive explanations on the differences and advantages of each one. I did my best to compile that research here.

Note, there are many types of finishes not mentioned here. I am only writing about the types used on Clearwater. Also, I have no references! At some point I may write a more in-depth article on this topic that will include other finishes, and…references.

Varnish (in all its lustre and glory) requires mindful preperation, a skilled hand, many thin coats, and ample time to dry and cure.

Varnish (in all its luster and glory) requires mindful preparation, a skilled hand, many thin coats, and ample time to dry and cure.

Varnish:

Varnish is made from a combination of resin (either plant-derived or synthetic), drying oils (most often tung or linseed), solvents (turpentine, etc.), UV protectors, and sometimes driers. Traditional knowledge says that varnishes give superior UV protection to wood that gets sun exposure, and a relatively long-lasting, flexible finish. Varnish’s flexibility makes it ideal for moving parts which might cause other harder finishes to crack, allowing moisture to damage the wood.

A proper varnish job requires a somewhat experienced hand, not only for a nice-looking finish, but also to ensure that the finish takes. If done improperly, varnish can crack, peel, delaminate, bubble, or never fully harden. Varnishing also requires a somewhat dust-free environment, nice weather, and lots of time to apply many coats. For our purposes on Clearwater, we tend only to use varnish on exterior wood that has a low likelihood of getting banged or chafed, such as hatch covers, since touch-ups are somewhat challenging and time consuming. Someone who knows what they are doing should scuff and apply a top coat of varnish once per season.

Greying in wood can be caused by sun damage when no UV-protective coating is used, or by a fungus. Some varnishes contain fungicide to prevent this.

Greying in wood can be caused by sun damage when no UV-protective coating is used, or by a fungus. Some varnishes contain fungicide to prevent this.

Penetrol:

Penetrol is at the opposite end of the spectrum from Varnish. It has no UV protective qualities, and is even rumored to cause greying or darkening of the wood when not removed and reapplied regularly, due to the linseed oil content. Although it keeps wood from drying out by helping to restore its natural oils, it doesn’t last long and needs frequent (almost weekly) applications. It’s nice because it is very quick and easy for anyone to apply, very easy to touch up chafed spots, kicks quickly, and doesn’t leave a tacky residue.

Polyurethane:

Polyurethane is a finish/sealant that has a very similar application and appearance to varnish, and therefore the two are often used interchangeably. Polyurethane differs from varnish in many ways that don’t matter to us very much, namely the way it is made, and the chemical process it goes through to “kick”. What IS relevant to us is that a polyurethane finish tends to be MUCH harder than varnish, meaning it holds up much better under certain circumstances. The down side is that it also tends to be less flexible, which means that it will crack much more easily on pieces that flex.

A point about UV protection: I’ve always been told that the difference between varnish and poly is that varnish protects against UV damage and poly doesn’t. From what I gather, this isn’t fully true, at least anymore. Both varnish and poly CAN contain UV protective additives, but from what I’ve read, over the long haul, the UV filters in polyurethane break down faster than those in varnish. I have not myself worked on the same piece of half-varnished and half-polyurethaned wood for 10 years, so I can’t speak from personal experience.

Wood Oil:

Everyone disagrees about protective coatings for blocks. Some say paint offers superior UV protection, others say it hides damage that should be addressed. Some oil, some poly. What do you do with your blocks?

Everyone disagrees about protective coatings for blocks. Some say paint offers superior UV protection, others say it hides damage that should be addressed. Some oil regularly, some poly. What do you do with your blocks?

There are a few different wood oil recipes (also known to boaters as “boat soup”) that have been used over the years. It is generally a mixture of two to four of the following in varying quantities: varnish, boiled linseed oil, turpentine, Penetrol, and Japan Drier. Boiled linseed oil is a plant-based oil that can help restore wood’s natural oils and keep it from drying out, but blackens wood quickly without frequent applications (more expensive tung oil can be used instead to eliminate this problem). Varnish gives some UV protection and a harder finish, but slows kicking time. Turpentine thins the mixture, allowing it to be absorbed better and dry more quickly. Penetrol is a brushing agent that both thins and contains oils that can be protective. Japan Drier speeds up the drying process, but too much causes discoloration.

Boat soup” is relatively easy to apply and can give great results, but depending on ratios, you can end up with a tacky finish that never hardens, or a weird color. It also takes some time to dry, and requires regular reapplication. The recipe we’re currently using is listed below, but if it’s giving you trouble, ask some old salt and you’ll get some good advice. Or do some experiments of your own and you can name the new mixture after your favorite Aunt.

Nov 192012
 

Recently in preparation for the winter, and as part of a regular maintenance schedule, we pulled Clearwater’s centerboard. For those of you who aren’t tall-ship experienced, I’ll try my best to explain what a centerboard is, how it works, and how we pulled it. I’ll let the photos explain the rest.

The centerboard is a 15 or so foot long retractable keel whose forward end pivots on a point inside the hull about a third of the way from the bow. The pivot point is inside the centerboard “trunk”, which is basically a big, framed out hollow in the middle of the boat, a bit like a wheel well. It is raised and lowered by a winch on a cable attached to the after end, at about the middle of the boat.

To pull the centerboard, lines are attached to the tops of the forward and after ends, and then run through blocks on deck. The board is hoisted a little to take the weight off the pin, and then on either side of the centerboard trunk, large metal caps are unscrewed to reveal the pivot point, out of which a large pin must be driven. As you may have guessed, removing these caps allows large amounts of water to pour into the boat, so time is of the essence. Plexiglass and a flashlight are used on either side to line up the openings in the trunk with the one in the centerboard. When you are thoroughly soaked and grateful that you vacuumed out the bilges so the bilge pumps wouldn’t get clogged, you drive out the pin and pop those caps back on. Then you take a breath.

The rest is gravy…lower the board, then run a “lazy line” under the hull to catch the lines the centerboard is hanging on, pull them to the other side, and haul up the board!

Lines are attached to both ends of the centerboard.

Lines are attached to both ends of the centerboard, forward…

The anchor bend.

…and aft. We chose to use the anchor bend.

Hoisting the centerboard to prepare for pulling the pin.

Hoisting the centerboard to prepare for pulling the pin.

Positioning the pipe wrench.

Positioning the pipe wrench.

When WD40, a four foot lever, and three grown sailors don't do trick, try heat.

When WD40, a four foot lever, and three grown sailors don’t do trick, try heat.

Next time, never seize.

Next time, never seize.

The cap is off! Using plexi-glass and a flashlight to align the hole in the centerboard with the hole in the trunk.

The cap is off! Using plexi-glass and a flashlight to align the hole in the centerboard with the hole in the trunk.

Flashlight.

Flashlight.

Driving out the pin.

Driving out the pin.

Waiting for the centerboard.

Waiting for the centerboard.

First sighting...

First sighting…

The centerboard is up!

The centerboard is up!

Clearwater with centerboard alongside.

Oct 302012
 

A lot of you probably know already that the HMS Bounty sank off the coast of North Carolina early Monday morning. The entire tall-ship community and beyond is in mourning.  I send my prayers and condolences to the family, friends and ship-mates of Claudene Christian, who was recently found unresponsive and later pronounced dead, and Captain Robin Walbridge, who has still not been found.  Deepest gratitude to the brave Coasties who went out into that storm to rescue the crew.

Oct 232012
 

We had a great transit up to Beacon the other day. It was cold, wet and windy, but we made the best of it (see photos below). And to top off a fantastic sail up the river, Captain Nick walked up to me as we neared out destination and told me that as long as it wasn’t too windy, he wanted me to take the boat in. It was a first for me, not just on Clearwater, but ever. I felt a twinge of nervousness, but excitement about attempting to maneuver 108 feet of traditional tall-ship to the dock prevailed.

Nick was the most fantastic teacher, letting me call the shots and try out my instincts as much as possible, but with full assurance that he would step in if necessary.  And it went great! I didn’t crash the boat, and Nick didn’t need to do too much, but more importantly I felt really good at the helm. I’ve docked her twice more since then, and I can’t wait for another chance.

Clearwater approaches the George Washington Bridge during a north-bound transit up the Hudson.

Clearwater approaches the George Washington Bridge during a north-bound transit up the Hudson. An overcast sky, half-hearted drizzle, and gusty winds were not surprising conditions at this time of year.

"Get out the topsail. You can set it however you want, except where it normally goes."

“Get out the topsail. You can set it however you want, except how it’s supposed to go.”

So we set it how we wanted.

So we set it how we wanted.

Clearwater's topsail set as a spinnaker.

Clearwater's enormous jib full of wind, as seen from the tip of the bowsprit.

Clearwater’s enormous jib full of wind, as seen from the tip of the bowsprit.

A pretty nice day after all.

A pretty nice day after all.

Oct 122012
 

One big mast, one big sailAlright, it’s time for some updates. The last two and a half months on Clearwater have been incredibly full. Lots of beautiful sailing up and down the Hudson, visits to the city, a festival here and there, and lots of teaching. I can’t believe it, but my contract is more than half over, and my planning for next steps is in full swing.

I found out while I was in Tasmania that I’m eligible for what they call a working holiday visa. I didn’t know about this visa when I went. Everyone should know about this! If I had I’m sure I would have applied for it and worked (rather than volunteered) during my time there. This 12 month visa is available to people with undergraduate degrees up to and including the age of 30, and allows them to seek temporary employment, spending no more than six months in each job. The idea is to facilitate cultural exchange between participating countries by making it easier for young people to visit.

Outboard practice in Tas.So, with a partner in Tasmania, a closing window of eligibility for this visa, and some Tasmanian qualifications, I’m planning on returning to the apple isle again in the New Year. My most exciting prospects for jobs in Hobart are working on a sight-seeing boat as a tour guide, running boats at a fish farm, and working on research vessels for UTAS or CSIRO, Australia’s national science agency. My goals for my next job are to get a lot of experience handling a small boat, or work on a boat with some scientific overlap, be it field observation or research.

Hopefully Iain and I will also have time to do some travel around the mainland, see some of the outback and the great barrier reef…maybe even another trip to New Zealand? A transit by sea is of course also in the world of possibilities. Right now I’m still in the planning stages, but I’m getting excited for a return to such a beautiful place.

Wineglass Bay, just one of the many gorgeous spots I'm looking forward to visiting again on my return to Tasmania.

Wineglass Bay, just one of the many gorgeous spots I’m looking forward to visiting again on my return to Tasmania. Photo by Iain.